- O​blix The Shard

6 high altitude dining restaurants in the UK

T​he best views to eat dinner to across the UK, from London to Edinburgh

45w ago

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Rising skylines across the country are giving way for high altitude dining with some impressive ways to experience sky-high dining cropping up (we're sorry) across the UK.

T​ake a non-stop lift up the tallest building in Western Europe, The Shard, a 72-storey skyscraper near London Bridge. On the 32nd floor you'll find Oblix – a glass-wrapped restaurant and bar lounge by Rainer Becker and Arjan Waney, founders of Japanese restaurants Zuma and Roka.

Waft up to a swanky restaurant tucked at the top of a shopping centre in Leeds via a private lift, fine-dine while teetering on a hill overlooking Edinburgh and watch as the city of Manchester’s lights flicker on at night while enjoying an amuse bouche in the sky.

W​hat all these restaurants have in common, apart from spectacular views and a lot of glass, is a sense of modern sophistication that's difficult to recreate at ground level. Oh the heady heights. Here’s our pick of the best high altitude restaurants in the UK.

The Lookout by Gardeners — Edinburgh

T​he Lookout by Gardener's Cottage Facebook

T​he Lookout by Gardener's Cottage Facebook

The Lookout opened at the end of 2018, a contemporary, cantilevered glass box suspended over the northwest slope of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, with jaw-dropping views and a menu to match.

I​n the kitchen Chef Dale Mailley tops and tails Calton Hill The Gardener’s Cottage at the bottom and its sister restaurant The Lookout teetering on the top. It’s his third Edinburgh eatery: in 2017 he launched Quay Commons, a bakery and café in Leith.

Book a table for lunch next to the massive window for gloriously unfettered view across the whole city and over to Fife. The lunchtime set menu of three courses for £30 including: Citrus cured Loch Etive sea trout, oyster emulsion, Borders Pheasant, Jerusalem artichoke, brussel sprouts and for dessert clementine and white chocolate toast, should keep you busy.

Book a table here now.

City Social — London

C​ity Social Facebook

C​ity Social Facebook

Ja​son Atherton's restaurant City Social can be found on the 24th floor of Tower 42, previously known as the NatWest Tower and London’s seventh tallest tower, though it’s still the second-highest in the City after the Heron Tower.

Head chef is Paul Walsh, who worked at the Savoy Grill under Marcus Wareing and then at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay on Royal Hospital Road, won the restaurant a Michelin star within the first six months off opening in 2014. The restaurant's bar has since relaunched as Social 24.

The view down the river is worth booking a table in itself. The food menu showcases the best in British produce and at the bar there's a three-course set Social Lunch Hour menu at £28, if you fancy something light. Resident DJs inject a clubby vibe on Friday nights if that's your jam.

B​ook a table here now

20 Stories — Manchester

2​0 Stories Manchester Facebook

2​0 Stories Manchester Facebook

T​he clue is in the name. Well sort of, this restaurant is actually on the 19th floor of No 1 Spinningfields and offers panoramic views of Manchester. At night, these views of the city are rather magical and by day you can happily snoop on people going about their business below.

I​t's likely, however, you will be too distracted by the menu curated by Head Chef Brian Hughson that not only showcases the best of the Northwest, but aims to source ingredients locally. This extends to the bar, with signature cocktails made with a local spin.

I​f you enjoy live music at toppling heights visit on a Wednesday, when you will get exactly that and there's also a wide-variety of pop-ups and events going on up there too.

Book a table here now.

Panoramic 34 — Liverpool

P​anoramic 34 Liverpool

P​anoramic 34 Liverpool

Yes, you guessed it: Panoramic 34 is on the 34th floor, and the building is Beetham West Tower in Liverpool. Stepping out of the lift you will be warmly greeted by a charming, smartly black-suited manager who will show you to a bar offering magnificent views over the Liver building and down to the Mersey river.

Quick fact: Panoramic 34 is set 300 feet above sea level and the windows wrap floor to ceiling around the restaurant giving a breathtaking 360° view of the city.

T​his is high-up and high-end restaurant is much like a plush corporate canteen — a deliberately simple take on luxury that allows the view to dazzle. T​he seven-course tasting menu comes recommended and includes dishes such as Rolled Gloucester old spot port terrine, poached halibut and Goosnargh Duck Breast.

B​ook a table here now

Oblix at the Shard — London

View from O​blix The Shard, Facebook

View from O​blix The Shard, Facebook

T​he trouble with being 32 floors high inside The Shard is you don't get to see The Shard, but this restaurant offers the best seats in London for views of The Gherkin, St. Pauls and all the bridges.

It is the brainchild of chef Rainer Becker, who started out his career at some of Germany’s top restaurants including Michelin star Koenigshof in Munich and Goethehaus in Bensberg. His first big London project was Japanese inspired restaurant Zuma, Roka, in Charlotte Street, followed.

Oblix opened its doors in 2013 and has since made. name for itself as one of the city's landmark dining options. It's smart, but also modern and relaxed with an open kitchen and a buzzy bar. The food is centred on the wood fired oven, charcoal grill and spit roast.

The restaurant recently launched "Ginuary", where guests are invited to try cocktails curated by four versatile Gin brands over the course of January. The cocktails are created by Bar Manager Aaron Masonde and paired with dishes designed by Executive-Chef Marcus Eaves.

B​ook a table here now.

T​he Crafthouse — Leeds

T​he Crafthouse Facebook

T​he Crafthouse Facebook

Perched on top of the busy Trinity Leeds shopping centre, Crafthouse is not what you might expect from it's pub-esque name, no craft beers or comforting pies here. This is a shiny, wine-and-diney affair only four floors up, but high enough to offer a delightful Leeds vista.

As is the custom with these high-up, high-end restaurants, Crafthouse has a lift ready to zip diners up the side of the building so they don't have to mingle with any shoppers below. The restaurant itself is a glass box on top of a statement building with a feel of the pristine.

That said, on the restaurant's website, the executive head chef promises "good honest food, cooked properly" with a focus on fresh British produce with classic French techniques.

B​ook a table here now.

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Comments (1)

  • I love the concept. Next time I'm in London, if I do nothing else, I want to have dinner in the Shard.

      10 months ago
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