- Kaley Dykstra on Unsplash

7​ fascinating facts about croissants to blow your mind

I​t's National Croissant Day today and all is not as it seems

38w ago

6.7K

T​oday is officially National Croissant Day!

What do you mean you had no idea? To be honest w​e almost missed it ourselves, but there's still time to embrace it as an excuse to eat a pile of buttery twists of goodness.

I​n a bid not to seem flaky like our favourite pastry we have dug deep to bring you some fascinating facts about croissants — the first being they're not actually French. We know!

Do you dunk yours in your coffee or bite the tail off it first? Are you a tear it into pieces and smother it in Nutella kind of person? Prefer the almond ones over fresh, simple and plain? Ever speant too much time pondering whether the pain au chocolat is a croissant at all?

Covered in jam and drizzled in butter or stuffed with gooey cheese: there is A LOT to think about and these facts will have you talking about and eating croissants from dawn until dusk fro a good week. Ready to have your minds blown.

C​roissants originated in Austria

Photo by Jacek Dylag on Unsplash

Photo by Jacek Dylag on Unsplash

Once upon a time in 1683 Vienna the Turkish tried to invade Vienna during a big battle seige over the city. Failing each time they decided to dig an underground tunnel, but Vienna’s bakers, who worked in the basement storerooms, heard the digging and alerted the army.

The Turkish invaders didn’t succeed and the bakers of Vienna were given high honours for saving the city. Bakers made pastry in the shape of crescent moon, that is the symbol of the Ottoman Empire (also known as the Turkish Empire), to celebrate this victory.

Paul Hanaoka on Unsplash

Paul Hanaoka on Unsplash

Croissants were brought to France by August Zang in 1839, when the Parisian press began to mention a new "Viennese Bakery" and its "exquisite and crisp rolls," which was founded by Zang.

Marie Antoinette adored them

F​lickr

F​lickr

Marie Antoinette adored them. She introduced the croissants to France and French bakers perfected the recipe of this pastry as the breakfast staple we know today. Let them eat cake!

T​he Kipferl came first

F​lickr

F​lickr

The croissant’s ancestor, the kipferl can be dated back to at least the 13th century in Austria and it is still sold in cafes and bakeries all over Austria and sold in supermarkets too.

T​he sweet treats

Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum on Unsplash

Claudio Schwarz | @purzlbaum on Unsplash

The traditional croissant was served at breakfast with frangipane or chocolate filling or jam and butter and they became a staple takeaway breakfast bite in French bakeries in 1920s.

T​hings got savoury in the '70s

K8 on Unsplash

K8 on Unsplash

In the early 1970s croissants became so popular, they were adapted into sandwiches of sorts and evolved from traditional sweet fillings into many savoury versions filled most commonly with cheese, ham, tomatoes. New sweet versions such as Almond croissants popped up here.

C​roissants became fast food

F​lickr

F​lickr

In the late 20th century the croissant caught the attention of the fast-food industry and manufacturers introduced pre-made frozen dough to supermarkets.

The baked-goods corporation Sara Lee introduced a frozen croissant to America in 1981, Burger King quickly followed with croissant breakfast sandwiches and the Mac Croissant wasn't far behind (see pic, doesn't it look tasty!). A 1984 New York Times article declared, “The Americanization of the croissant” had well and truly begun. You're not kidding!

Join In

Comments (5)

  • I love them. When I was 15 my brother and I ordered some in an Amsterdsm cafe, he had butter etc on his but I wanted mine plain, as I prefer them that way. His were nicely presented on a plate whereas mine were sealed in a clear plastic bag. We received some rather odd looks from staff and patrons alike as we sat at our table, with me eating mine out of said bag...

      8 months ago
  • Until embarrassingly recently, I had only ever had them on their own in their natural, glorious, buttery state. I am not very much into lightly toasting them and having them with smoked cheese *chef's kiss*

      8 months ago
Loading...
Loading...
5