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Adventures in 1970s food: Frankfurter Bake recipe

Alterntive title: Lockdown No-Supermarket-For-Weeks-Desperation Bake

1y ago
4.4K

What can I say. The 1970s gave us many great things: David Bowie, Space Hoppers, Decimalisation, The Silver Jubilee, the concept of using brown and orange for interiors, and many other great things. But it was also a dark era of home cooking, where things were microwaved, boiled, simmered and invented, that never should have been. Peanut Butter Soup anyone?

One recipe that is either hideous or genius, depending on which angle you view it from, is a classic from the brain of Marguerite Patten, one of the first 'celebrity chefs' who grew in popularity after her programme on the BBC. She passed away in 2015, leaving a legacy of weird foodstuffs in her wake.

I should most probably give her the credit that she deserves, as it was her who taught many of our grandparents to cook, and our parents at that. And she has a killer recipe for fudge which I'll post up here at some point too.

Cooking with Frankfurters is hit and miss. Given the world of processed meat is not always the most transparent, it's hard to really know what goes into them. Also, they can be (Ye Olde Oake from Morrisons particularly) bland and tasteless.

Personally I recommend spending a bit more and get gourmet ones that actually taste of something. However given where we already are, we've already gone down that rabbit hole of processed stuff, so ultimately it might not matter that much.

1970s Frankfurter Bake recipe

Proceed with caution.

Prep time15min
Cook time40min
Total time55min
Serves4
CuisineBizarre
MealHopefully not your last...

Ingredients

  • 1 pint/generous half litre of chicken stock
  • 1 - 2 chicken stock cubes
  • 4oz/100g long-grain rice
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 onions
  • 4 - 6oz/ 125-150g sliced French beans (green beans)
  • 2 tablespoons finely-chopped green pepper
  • seasoning
  • 1 can Frankfurter Sausages approx 1 and a half points/0.75kg
  • 1 can of sweetcorn

Instructions

  1. Bring the stock or water and stock cubes to a boil.
  2. Add the rice, bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes.
  3. Add the peeled, diced carrots and onions, the beans, chopped green pepper and seasoning. Cook for a further five minutes.
  4. Cut some of the sausages into thin slices and halve the remainder.
  5. Question your life choices.
  6. Mix the sliced sausages and sweetcorn into the rice mixture together with any liquid from the cans.
  7. Spoon into the casserole or dish, top with the halved Frankfurters and bake for 20 minutes or until the rice is tender in a moderate oven.

To serve:

  1. Serve hot with mixed salads.

To vary:

  1. Use diced cooked ham or cooked chicken in place of Frankfurters or add diced uncooked white fish at stage 2, together with some shelled prawns.

Recipe Notes

The instructions are verbatim of the recipe card. Although I can imagine this might be very nice, it also has the potential to be terrible. However, if you find yourself scraping around your cupboards during the lockdown, this could be a saving recipe.

Recipe by

Marguerite Patten

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Comments (4)

  • I've been looking through one of my mum's inherited '70s cookbooks recently. It seems it was a time when food that looked symmetrically perfect was desirable.

      1 year ago
    • Good story Chris, thanks for posting.

      The use of mass produced , high quality art deco shaped Tupperware jello moulds, to produce neat savoury meals was a popular food prep method, because they were easy to use, and made good use of left...

      Read more
        1 year ago
  • I would totally make this! Making vintage recipes are a little like time travel right to the era.

      1 year ago
  • A quick walk through the local thrift shop and Woolworths yield the basics of a '50s to '70s art deco waterfall jello meal.

    This is the famous Aussie Aeroplane Jelly.

    It's the zero sugar version.

    So I guess a savoury entrΓ©e , mains or a sweet desert could be made with it.

      1 year ago
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