Emily in Paris: The new Netflix comedy covers all the French stereotypes

    Let me know what clichés you think are true about French cuisine

    7w ago

    8.8K

    I've watched the new American romantic drama series, Emily in Paris, on Netflix. It's been getting some very mixed reviews, mostly about how it's completely and utterly terrible, but also that you'll end up binge-watching the whole thing in 48 hours flat.

    How can I describe my feelings about the French cuisine and the very unrealistic lifestyle represented in that comedy? I don't really know. But what I can do is look at the stereotypes versus reality when it comes to the representation of French cuisine in the show.

    There are so many clichés in Emily in Paris, almost too many to list. And with the culinary stereotypes... it might be things you've already heard, or things you've always believed to be true.

    French people don't always drink wine at lunch (©Netflix)

    French people don't always drink wine at lunch (©Netflix)

    I don't want to spoil the potential love story between Emily and Gabriel, her handsome French neighbour... Without really describing the plot, he works in a restaurant as a chef, which is not surprising. And you know we've had one of the best examples of the French cooking stereotypes from Disney, in Ratatouille.

    Exit the smart and talented rat, Remy, say hello to Gabriel, top chef in a typical Parisian brasserie. I don't need to tell you Paris is known for its culinary traditions. Some of the best French chefs are settled there and contribute to the international spread of traditional specialities such as beef bourguignon, snails, and many other meals, which originally come from other French regions such as the Auvergne or Burgundy.

    The French capital is also known for its delicious and tasty croissants, as Emily shows us on a fictional Instagram post, as well as the romantic bars and cafés with a perfect view of the Seine river. It's not a completely false representation... just a very romanticised one.

    Ladurée, a French traditional bakery, is known all over the world for their macarons and other pastries. The bakery has probably the best croissants in Paris, only if you're ready to pay a pretty penny to taste them. Otherwise, you can go to a local bakery, and buy your (also delicious) croissant for a reasonable price. Don't forget the secret ingredient of the recipe is the butter. More butter makes for a delicious croissant, not its price.

    Tell me, what are the French cooking clichés you know?

    I'll try to reply about the stereotypes and if they are true or false.

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    Comments (20)

    • The following is based on experiences I made in France, so it's not just clichés. I do acknowledge that all that happened decades ago, so maybe things have changed since then. One experience was that French cooking is either excellent or completely uneatable without very much in between. Once I had the pleasure of being invited to a french dinner in Locquirec/Bretagne and it was one of the best meals ever. Another time, when going home from France, we stopped at a roadside restaurant. Now I'm not very critical with respect to roadside restaurants but one simply couldn't eat the stuff. The burger was still cold and semi-raw inside, same for the fries. I mean, roadside places elsewhere in Europe are just what they are, nobody expects Michelin stars there, but at least you can eat what they serve.

      Another time we tried to get something to eat sometime in the afternoon in a small village. It was admittedly well past lunch time and before dinner time. The waitress looked at us as if we asked her to kill her parents but finally she gave us some cold cuts, which were actually very good.

      With all that my present mindset regarding eating in France is that you need some preparation 😊

        1 month ago
      • I quite agree with you about the roadside restaurants. We can't have Michelin guide's meals for a reasonable or cheap prices. About the bad quality of some food, it could be the same thing in any restaurant as well I think. One of the best...

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          1 month ago
      • To be fair, I forgot to mention one good thing and that has to be food in Alsace. Some years ago I was in Mulhouse and Strasbourg and was left with the impression that you can really go pretty much everywhere, the food is always going to be...

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          1 month ago
    • Everyone knows the French drink wine all the time

        1 month ago
      • I'm sorry to disappoint you, but I am not personally a wine lover. I can drink champagne, cider and some white wines but that's all. I'm a weird French girl 😂😉😂

          1 month ago
    • All I remember from the last time I was in France (1960s, 8 yrs. old) is how sick I got from the food. Sorry, but August Escoffier did not invent fine dining; that award goes to the Delmonico brothers of New York.

      Also, never drink tap water in France. It's awful.

        1 month ago
      • Don't be sorry. It's your right not to like the French food. Some dishes can be unfamiliar or just disgusting sometimes. I also hate some French food.

          1 month ago
    • There are Ladurée shops in NYC. I bought the most expensive macaroon and aNapoleon pastry ever at Ladurée near central park, and they were horrible, disappointing. I was 😤😡 after eating the Napoleon 😅. French restaurants in NYC tend to be pretentious and overpriced for the quality of the food. My husband and I discovered a really good place in Boston called ma maison, it has great food!

        1 month ago
      • I've never bought macarons in one of these places just because it's really expensive so I don't want to waste my money at all. One of the amazing things I saw was the huge queue in front of the Ladurée bakery in Champs Elysées. With my friend, we...

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          1 month ago
      • Yes, they do. The owner of my local bakery is from Brittany and his bread and pastries are delicious 😍, with good quality ingredients at reasonable prices.

          1 month ago
    • Interesting...no real set thoughts on French food because it does not seem popular here, maybe due to population. It would be great if you have the opportunity to post authentic French recipes so I can try some. 😁 preferably no snails...lol

        1 month ago
      • I just realized I didn't ask you where do you come from. It could be a great idea to find and write about authentic recipes I know very well. I promise you not to publish a recipe with snails not because I don't like them, but just it is very...

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          1 month ago
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