Learning about where my ancestors are from is something I have always been deeply interested in, because I love to know which places in the world I'm a part of. The little American farm town I grew up in was formed by immigrants who settled there starting in the 1700's, with the new generations continuing to reside there today. Tradition and culture are important to the people there, and one of the most beloved cultural aspects is of course the food.

Growing up, church and ethnic festivals were always overflowing with traditional Slovak food like stuffed cabbage, pierogies, schnitzel, kielbasa, potato pancakes, nut rolls, and of course a classic dish - haluski.

One set of my great-grandparents immigrated to the United States in the 1900's from the tiny village of Sacurov, Slovakia (back then, Austria-Hungary), not too far east of the city KoŇ°ice. They eventually settled in that small farm town of Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania. The recipes they and so many other immigrants brought over with them shaped the town's culture, which is still very much a part of life there, and one of the major aspects I truly miss since I've moved away.

Annual "Glass and Ethnic Festival" in my hometown - LOTS of food / My photo

Annual "Glass and Ethnic Festival" in my hometown - LOTS of food / My photo

Haluski has different variations depending on the area it is coming from. Traditional Slovak haluski is made with potato dumplings and bacon. Polish haluski is made with fried cabbage and noodles, but this is also sometimes made in Slovakia, and is the one I share with you today.

It is so easy and delicious that you will want to eat a bowl of it by itself! You can also prepare kielbasa meat on top for a well-rounded meal, which I highly recommend. This is what I remember fondly as a child at the annual ethnic festival.

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The simplest and cheapest of ingredients!

The simplest and cheapest of ingredients!

The finished product in the pot. I should've had a bigger cabbage for this batch.

The finished product in the pot. I should've had a bigger cabbage for this batch.

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