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- M​y usual Starbucks order... FREE tap water.

The #​felixfakeaways Challenge Got Me Thinking...

W​hile not wasting food is always the goal, what are some other ethical, environmentally friendly, and wallet friendly ways that you all save money and cut down on waste in the world of food and drink?

7w ago
3.9K

L​et me begin by saying that I am not cheap, but frugal. There really isn't a whole lot of difference between the two terms, but I like to differentiate between them by thinking of frugality as smart and forward thinking, where cheap is just stingy and unattractive. Maybe I am just trying to convince myself that I am better than cheap , who knows, moving on.

S​arnies of the 70's and the other frugal recipes on FoodTribe's YouTube page have always intrigued me as I connect on a much deeper level to the frugality and down to earthness (not a word, I know) of them. Now, does my attraction to frugality mean I fried up some cat food for dinner last night? Certainly not, although I did enjoy watching Mr. May eat it, but I truly believe that there are ways to save money and still enjoy food as much if not more so by consciously acquiring it. This can take all sorts of forms, from shopping locally, buying less, and reheating and repurposing different leftovers to make them interesting instead of making them waste. This has benefits environmentally and fiscally- a win-win if you ask me.

An example of conscious food consumption in my own life is w​hen I go out to eat, I never do the following (and by never I mean NEVER). I never buy water, I never buy coffee from a chain like Starbucks, and I never pay for a side as at least one will usually come free with your main meal. If your main course does not come with a side, the restaurant is probably cheap which, as described above, is not attractive. I will order the occasional appetizer like twice a year, but that is all. Sure, most of the time this is just because I don't want to spend money on it, but I also believe that at times, ordering an appetizer distracts from the memorableness of the actual meal. If I order really good boneless wings and then get my main course of an average hamburger, I will usually forget the hamburger and remember the wings. It is a balancing act. This is just one example of being more conscious with food, but one that is particularly relevant in my own life.

N​ow that I have rambled on for a while, the whole point of this article was to get you all involved, so I ask the following: how do you consciously acquire food? Do you purposely save leftovers? Do you not buy things you can get for free at home (*cough* water *cough*)? Tell me below!

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Comments (17)

  • 90% of the time, we make double portions of dinner so the leftovers are lunch for the next day. When we can't do that, there is always bread for a sandwich or whatever. Also, if we make a meal served with rice, I keep leftover rice separate in the fridge and use it later to make fried rice. Once I tried collecting and freezing leftover peelings and vegetable offcuts to make stock, which did work quite well, but it seemed a bit pointless when relatively cheap vegetable stock cubes were readily available. In saying all this, if I go to a restaurant and my main doesn't come with broccoli but there is a broccoli side dish on the menu, it is always ordered as a means of justifying whatever potentially unhealthy main I have ordered 😂

      1 month ago
    • Cooking double portions is a good idea! Particularly if it is a dinner you know you like😆

        1 month ago
    • I don't often make food I don't like 😂 though there is something about risotto. Whenever my partner suggests to make it for dinner, I usually turn my nose up at the idea, it's never a meal I feel like having, but it's almost like I forget how yum...

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        1 month ago
  • Not going to lie, I tend to always overrule the 'I could get this at home' conscience prick.

      1 month ago
  • Very nice article! I never buy water too, and I haven’t bought coffee in ages, but this is due to Covid 😊

    Now, in regards to food waste, I hate throwing food away and 99% of the time I’m not doing it!

    I always have a list for my food shopping, firstly because my memory sucks, but secondly because I have a plan of what I’ll be cooking in the week! So I know from ahead what I’ll make and I usually batch cooking as well!

    Another thing I do is when I buy herbs, I wash them, chop them and freeze them if I don’t use them immediately!

    Also, when I have leftover bread I make croutons!

    I always freeze ripen bananas for smoothies, if i don’t use them in baking!

      1 month ago
    • Thank you Natali! That is a good idea with your herbs. I might have to try that instead of always getting them dried and in a shaker of sorts. I think we all use a list haha!

        1 month ago
    • Also bananas that have gone brown are great to repurpose that way! I do that too or add them to some pancake batter

        1 month ago
  • I do drink water from the tap because buying water I already pay for does not make sense.

      1 month ago
    • Agreed!! Even if you need to buy a filter, it is still far better than actually paying for water

        1 month ago
    • I completely agree! I never understood that.

        1 month ago
  • Leftovers? What are they? Wifey and I never have anything left to worry about. Cook what you want to eat and no more, that's what we do. I do cook stews though that last us two or three days. If peelings are considered leftovers, then wifey uses orange peal, garlic skins, old tea leaves, etc to feed her plants. We do buy water because the water at home is not really good enough to drink. We also buy it when we're out walking because it's warm where we live. On the whole though, I would say we are like you , frugal.

      1 month ago
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